Institute News

Female Bear Prepares to Walk on Treadmill

Tatqiq, a 580-pound polar bear at the San Diego Zoo, is making new strides in her “fitness” training. Animal care staff and scientists at the Zoo’s Institute for Conservation Research have been preparing the 17-year-old female to voluntarily take part in a U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) project that is studying the energy demands polar bears face in the Arctic—an example of the role that zoos play in conservation science.

San Diego Zoo Global Rushes to Provide Emergency Aid to Kenyan Sanctuary

 

The critically endangered hirola antelope is facing an uncertain future today, as a severe drought in northern Kenya threatens its survival. Conservationists and ecologists are concerned that the continued lack of rainfall—already taking a devastating toll on the area’s livestock and wildlife—could decimate this species, which many consider to be the most endangered antelope on the planet.

Successful Captive Breeding of the Endangered Pacific Pocket Mouse Results in Its Relocation into the Species' Historic Range

The population of Orange County, California is growing, but its newest group of residents won’t block any views of the ocean. Fifty endangered Pacific pocket mice, which make their homes underground, are about to be relocated into an area of Laguna Coast Wilderness Park, part of OC Parks.

Five Critically Endangered Hawaiian Crows Are Being Prepared for Release

San Diego Zoo Global scientists and Northrop Grumman Corporation engineers have joined forces to gain a better understanding of the Arctic and the increasing threats to its iconic polar bears.

Employee teams competing in Northrop Grumman’s Wildlife Challenge are developing new approaches to autonomous flight technology, which San Diego Zoo Global scientists intend to use to expand their observation of climate change impacts on polar bear populations and sea ice habitats in far-off locations.

Five of Hawaii’s Critically Endangered Crows Being Prepared for Release.

 

More than 100 local mountain yellow-legged frogs (MYLF) will be making the San Bernardino Mountains their home after San Diego Zoo Global and the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) reintroduced the large group into the mountainous habitat—increasing the wild population of an endangered species that, in some areas, is on the brink of being extirpated.

A study released this week (Sept. 12, 2016) is shedding new light on how scientists evaluate polar bear diet and weight loss during their fasting season. On average, a polar bear loses up to 30 percent of its total body mass while fasting during the open-water season.

As conservationists work to recover endangered species populations, taking individuals that are maintained and protected under human care and reintroducing them into the wild, it becomes apparent that there is a great deal to learn about the science of species recovery. In a paper published in the recent edition of the Journal of Applied Ecology, a team of wildlife experts from San Diego Zoo Global, the U.S. Geological Survey, the U.S.